WOMEN FILES NINE FRAUDULENT CLAIMS WITH STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANY

by

Charges:

Insurance Fraud 18 Pa C.S. § 4117 – F3

Attempted Theft by Deception 18 Pa C.S. § 3922 – F3 (5 counts)

Theft by Deception 18 Pa C.S. § 3922 – F3 (4 counts)

Forgery 18 Pa C.S. § 4101 – F3 (9 counts)

Impersonating a Public Servant 18 Pa C.S. § 4912 – M2

Philadelphia – Detectives from the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office Insurance Fraud Unit arrested Angel Carey after receiving a referral from State Farm Insurance Company. On August 27, 2011, Carey claimed that Hurricane Irene damaged her home in Philadelphia. State Farm resolved Carey’s claim by paying her eight thousand five hundred and fourteen dollars for repairs to her roof and fifty nine thousand four hundred and fifty two dollars for damages to her personal property. Despite receiving these claim checks, Carey continued to report additional items damaged to State Farm by submitting forged receipts.

Carey filed nine additional claims with State Farm for the following allegedly damaged items: a camera valued at approximately thirty-eight thousand dollars, a piece of art valued at four thousand four hundred and fifty-two dollars, a keyboard valued at four thousand one hundred and three dollars, an antique record player valued at three thousand two hundred and sixty one dollars, additional repairs to her roof valued at seven thousand three hundred and seventy-one dollars, a server and audio interface valued at six thousand six hundred and ninety-three dollars, musical instruments costing approximately three thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight dollars, furniture costing eight thousand nine hundred and forty-six dollars, and a Sony instrument valued at six thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight dollars. State Farm issued payments of twelve thousand and five hundred dollars for the camera, two thousand six hundred and sixty dollars for the artwork, three thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine dollars for a keyboard, and three thousand one hundred and fifty two dollars for the antique record player. Detectives later determined that all nine submitted receipts were fraudulent and that Carey never owned any of the above-listed items.

The investigation also revealed that Carey also lied about her employment on several occasions during the course of the insurance company’s investigation. Carey first told State Farm investigators that she was a Comcast employee and that the camera she claimed was damaged was originally given to her by Comcast. In support of this claim, Carey provided a letter which stated that she was a Comcast employee. Insurance Fraud Unit detectives contacted a representative from Comcast who stated that Carey was never an employee nor did the company ever give an employee a camera. Furthermore, in a recorded statement with State Farm investigators, Carey also claimed that she was a Philadelphia Police Officer who worked in the ninth district. Detectives contacted the Philadelphia Police Personnel Department who confirmed that Carey was never a member of the police department.

Carey was arrested on June 26, 2016 for submitting nine fraudulent receipts in an attempt to bilk State Farm and was charged with Insurance Fraud, four counts of Theft by Deception, five counts of Attempted Theft by Deception, nine counts of Forgery and one count of Impersonating a Public Servant. She is next scheduled to appear in Philadelphia Municipal Court on July 11, 2016.

 


%d bloggers like this: